Expenses

Retire Early. Travel the World.

Last updated: October 2019

early retirement

Life in Ubud, Bali – Photo by Go Curry Cracker (Instagram)

It has now been 7 full years since we left the working world behind and leaped into a life of travel and adventure.

Our plan was to save at least 25x our desired cost of living, with children, in our then home of Seattle. We then set off to see the world with the idea that we would continue to LBYM (live beneath your means) so our investments could continue to grow.

In 7 years we have spent an inflation-adjusted (2019$) $526,409, for an annual average of $75,200, or approximately $200/day.

This includes all expenses: housing, transportation, food, taxes, health insurance, medical care, etc…
Blog income & expenses are reported separately.

Based on the 4% Rule, spending $75k per year requires a portfolio value of at least $1.9 million. (25 * $75k = $1.9kk)

See our Annual Reports for more details about our travels and adventures, and how much they cost:
2013: $38,996 (see our full 2013 annual report.)
2014: $59,086 (see our full 2014 annual report.)
2015: $56,900 (see our full 2015 annual report.)
2016: $72,002 (see our full 2016 annual report.)
2017: $93,648 (see our full 2017 annual report.)
2018: $89,000 (see our full 2018 annual report.)
2019: $95,000 (estimated)
* numbers are actual spending for the year (not inflation-adjusted to current date.)

Everything we are doing is repeatable.  Whether you want to plan a 5-star travel life, you intend to slum it, or you just want to participate in the popular sport of fiscal voyeurism, our spending data is on full display. Hopefully, it will help you plan a life of travel and adventure.

It’s a small world. We hope to see you out there

Jeremy, Winnie, & Julian
Go Curry Cracker!

111 Comments

  1. Crystal

    Dear Jeremy and Winnie,
    I’ve been reading many of your posts, since my husband and I are planning to travel around the world like you guys starting next year. ;) As I read your posts about finances, I don’t see you talking about costs relating to children in your forward projections.
    We’re planning to have kids in about two years, and we realize we might have to settle down in one place once we have children in order to provide a stable environment for education and their friends, social environment, etc. Not to mention, it looks like it will cost a lot to raise kids. So, we were wondering if you guys have any tips to share. Do you guys plan to have kids? If so, have you planned for the expenses of raising children, and do you think you’ll keep traveling while raising them? Thanks!

    Reply
  2. arwen521

    What health insurance do you purchase for so little?

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      “This included health insurance through the end of November 2013, when we decided to self-insure (after 6 months in Taiwan, Winnie now has full health and dental insurance for about $12.50/month, while I remain self-insured)”

      Reply
  3. Kim Cheng

    Is it including air ticket?

    Reply
  4. Amber

    Very, very smart people. Wish I could follow in your foot steps.

    Reply
  5. Lyn

    Teach me how!! Please!!

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      Hi Lyn

      Sharing how to do what we did is the reason we started this blog. This would be a good starting point: https://gocurrycracker.com/start-here/

      If you have questions on any posts, I read every comment

      Cheers

      Jeremy

      Reply
  6. Jerry

    How did you spend so little in August for housing in the US?

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      House sitting

      Reply
  7. Kay

    WOW!!! What an inspiration

    Reply
  8. Kitty Kat

    Congrats on your early retirement and life. I am a retired teacher of 35 years. My yearly salary never reached $45,000 a year and consequently my retirement monthly income is less than $2000 per month not counting $400 in monthly insurance costs or taxes. I guess I was in the wrong profession. Sad that teachers in retirement qualify for public housing and food stamps.WELLSANNE

    Reply
    • Seanr

      You are an inspiration to work until I’m 63. Began teaching at 25. Will make about 90% of my salary, plus TSA’s if I make it to 63 years old without completely burning out. (I’m 45 now.) Then I’ll be able to swim all day long, travel occasionally, and probably volunteer at public schools(I really do love kids), until I comfortably kick the bucket.

      Reply
  9. Kevin Kim

    You are living a dream!!!! I’m so thrilled and envious for you guys, good luck with the baby!

    Reply
  10. Julie Johnson

    It sounds good to ‘be retired’ but what do you actually do every day. After a while sightseeing even in really fantastic places starts to lose its novelty. Do you study? Volunteer locally? I don’t mean to be a wet blanket, I am truly trying to imagine being unemployed for years. I guess now that a baby is coming I know what you will be doing going forward. Congratulations and good luck.

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      I’ve been meaning to write a “But What Do You Do All Day!?” post, but have been too busy to get around to it

      I suppose the way to think of it isn’t that we are unemployed, we are funemployed. We can do whatever we want whenever we want, and we do

      Reply
      • Julie Johnson

        But what is a typical week- if there is such a thing. What is it that you actually want to do now that you have been free for a year Most people I know that have extended free time get bored after a while. You don’t have ‘things’ to decorate, maintain or fix up, eating out isn’t exciting if you do it every day, Many of the world’s wonders start looking alike after a lot of travel. If you don’t have a ‘place’ you can’t really have an creative hobby like painting or woodworking that requires space. You don’t carry extended family with you so there isn’t the time that many people spend visiting and helping out with relatives, So you learned Spanish and how to make jewelry. What else?

        Reply
        • Go Curry Cracker

          I have a whole blog about that, Julie :)

          I think we have very different world views. We don’t need a list of 10 things to do every day. There is no “what else”

          We have creative hobbies (guitar and flute and painting and writing). We love eating out, and it doesn’t get old. Food is a passion. Each wonder of the world is unique and beautiful and amazing

          It’s going on 3 years now, and I haven’t been bored a single day, and have no idea how we ever had time to go into an office

          Reply
          • Bryan

            You guys are awesome! I love your statement to Julie that there is no “what else”. You have inspired me….

            Reply
          • RWeThereYet!

            Typically normal 9 to 5 folks can not fathom the concept of not having a routine. The regular life does not train you to step outside of this “normal” path. We all are trained from our childhood to go to school, go to work, follow a set path. We quickly find ourselves at unease thinking about having a freedom to do anything. It’s unfortunate that we find life to be more meaningful when we have a job, a routine, lot of chores; rather than having freedom to pursue or try out different things in life.
            Congratulations to you guys! You are an inspiration. Hope we will soon be there where you are at today.

            Reply
  11. Chepo-Pack

    If you make over $100K a year of course you can also do it but most people do not make that good of a salary.

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      That is correct, most people don’t make over $100k per year. Only about 20% of US households do

      But it isn’t what you make, it is what you keep

      Families earning much less own cars, commute long distances from big houses, dine out regularly, and buy iPhones. Don’t do those things and savings will explode

      Use the saved commute time to grow income

      Reply
      • Luis Alicea

        I agree with you, Jeremy. Unfortunately, most people learn how much to spend, instead how much to save. In addition to cars, big houses and unnecessary things, an item is missing: Credit Cards. People reach the limit too fast to pay them too slow!! And most people have more than three credit cards paying them on monthly basis.

        Reply
      • Brendan

        Great response!! That is the biggest lesson in all of this. People waste so much money they could be saving. If you are smart a small salary can do amazing things.

        Reply
      • Andrew

        Well said!! We have been telling that to our kid and nieces & nephews and they won’t listen.
        “But it isn’t what you make, it is what you keep”

        Reply
      • Donald

        Interesting, people waste more money than they realize. And while most don’t make over a 100k per year, this still can be done if you work a little longer and save your money. Most people are locked into the idea that they have to work to 67 to get SS and spend their entire life doing something that is boring and of no interest, just to make money. Congratulations on your accomplishment, life is too short to spend in an office or cubicle.

        Reply
        • Demetriy

          We have no TV so that’s one more bill less and we don’t waist our time for that. I get lots of questions “what you do for fun?” my answer is every thing I do is fun. I have two girls and I rather spend more time with them than with TV.

          Reply
  12. steven

    Have you guys considered part time teaching in Asia? I am a California native who has taught in S.Korea and now Indonesia. I hardly call it work. But, teachers get free housing and nice paychecks. Many teachers I have met in Asia do 2-3 year stints in various countries (travel, culture, bills paid)

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      Hi Steven

      Teaching gig is a good gig I think, lots of people do it. We don’t need the income and prefer having all of our time available for other things

      Reply
  13. Kristin Lansdown

    Hi! I think what you are doing is inspiring and congrats on your baby! My hubby and I travel quite a bit, more than most. My career is in retirement and long term care so I can be mobile. My hubby not so much at this time. Our kids are almost out of the nest and we are 44yrs.old. This next chapter is about our retirement and traveling. My question is how do you plan to pay for long term care/expenses? Are you planning to make some revenue above the investments? I will start following you as I follow a few other couples and love to share your stories in my retirement academies. Look forward to more!

    Reply
    • J

      I wonder if they’re planning to retire in Taiwan? They have good health care over there for the elderly, even for foreign nationals. I once had to get an urgent surgery to remove a tumor and happened to be in Taiwan. I only paid around $50 US dollars in total for the pre-examination, referral, surgery, and post-operation treatment. Granted it was a minor surgery, it is still unbelievably cheap! Two regular copayments at the USA would easily surpass the amount of money I had to pay for that operation 6 years ago!

      P.S. Many of the doctors in Taiwan have medical degrees from accredited American universities on American soil. My doctor was able to communicate with me in fluent English and had his MD diploma in his office to prove his credentials.

      Reply
      • Go Curry Cracker

        We don’t plan to retire in Taiwan, but will visit here every couple of years to visit family

        Healthcare in Taiwan is very reasonably priced though.
        As part of a health check, I had a chest x-ray, EKG, and blood work done. My total price, without insurance, without discount, and without subsidy, was $50. That’s it

        That is roughly the price of one aspirin in a hospital in the US

        Reply
  14. sandra T

    but how do we figure out,where to put our savings so it will grow?

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      Hi Sandra

      I love the Stock Series on Jim Collins’ blog.
      http://jlcollinsnh.com/stock-series/

      Read that whole series and you will be more knowledgeable than 90% of the planet

      Cheers

      Jeremy

      Reply
  15. Cade

    That is awesome! My required retirement saving goal has always been 2.5 mil. I guess maybe I should re-evaluate that figure. I think most people including myself are trapped in a rigid thinking of what retirement should be. Way to break the mold!

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      If you want (need?) to spend 100k a year, $2.5 million is the right number

      But there is a lot of great living to be done on significantly less spending

      Reply
  16. robyne

    once you have a baby, you’d better get a job. those critters are expensive!!

    Reply
  17. MrBeck

    You guys are awesome. Well done. Congrats on all- Much love

    Reply
  18. Levie M. Ayeras

    congratulations to both of you….I guess it is everybody’s wish and dreams to do or experience what both of you have achieve so far…once again, congratulation and more exciting experience for both of you.

    Reply
  19. mike

    I hope to do the same in 4 yrs. Retirement in a RV cruising the USA hiking and biking Sedona AZ for

    Reply
  20. Derrick

    Thanks for the story. I read you saved $1M for retirement. Do you think this is enough to last? I am single, 45 years old. I often wonder how much would it would take for me to retired now. Can you comment? Congrates on your baby.

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      Derrick, a 4% withdrawal rate from invested assets will stand the test of time. For $40k annual spending, $1 million is enough

      See this post for more details: https://gocurrycracker.com/path-100-equities/

      Reply
  21. D

    Reading all these replies make me realize that most of the people are so used to the working lifestyle and the matter of consequences that they forgot how to truly live. You are a true inspiration to me and I wish one day i could do the same. May god bless you wherever you and your family travels and live happy forever!

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      Hi D

      It is indeed very hard to think outside the box. What we are doing is very unconventional, and the natural response is to question and doubt

      I can empathize though, I used to think the same way

      Thank you kindly

      Jeremy

      Reply
  22. Sam

    Good for you and your family most people have fear to live their dreams like me once. now I am older life is short, we all should live our dream what every it might be. Keep up the good work live your dream to the fullest.

    Reply
  23. Bill McLean

    Great accomplishment and financial detail you two! You’re an inspiration for sure at a time in my life I’ve been contemplating the same thing. I have a larger net worth than yours, am older at 47, own a business and have two young kids who live with their mother- so it’s a larger leap by most aspects for me. However, your story is very motivating. Just gotta figure out how to be back home often enough to spend time with the kids so I’m not a loser father. Congrats on your lifestyle!

    Reply
  24. mikepatel76mike

    I came to usa with $500, after 14 years i own two paid off homes, always stayed debt free. During first seven years i worked 70 hrs week, the only time i took vacation is when i went to my country. Warren buffet is my inspiration, remeber his quote “Buy what you can afford, not what you want”. Never buy big house, in inital stage of life always buy smaller home, and pay it off faster. Once you have enough money to buy second one rent the first one and buy another….Never buy new car, buy decent car with 30 to 40 k miles and take good care of it..

    Reply
    • HB

      To me he strangest part about this budget is that most of the money he spends, biggest amount every month goes to dinning out. I guess if you love it its worth it. Me personally I would feel weird every day skimming myself things like a car flat screen the electronics iPhones luxuries like that yet burn near a g a month in restaurants with nothing to show for it . I’d personally would rather spend money on things I will have and throat will last over an hour. It’s honestly just shows what a ripoff the restaurant Industy has become all over the world. it really is terrible and a crime paying 20 dollars for lettuce and 2 prices of chicken.

      Reply
      • Go Curry Cracker

        Isn’t it great that people’s interests are so diverse. What is skimming to one person is thriving to another

        Although, we have iPhones, and a Macbook air, and a custom built guitar, and a handmade flute, and…

        And $20 buys a whole lot more than 2 pieces of chicken
        https://gocurrycracker.com/3-meals-in-san-miguel-de-allende-mexico-plus-dessert/

        We live ridiculously luxurious lives. It just costs less than a typical household

        Reply
  25. Lori

    You both are such an inspiration. My husband and I purchased a home in a great neighborhood five years ago with cash (at the right place at the right time….pure luck) that we used from our 401K. We have four children so we purchased a new van at that time, which will proudly be paid off in 6 months! :) We are both in our mid 30’s. My husband does work full time and I myself work contingent. Yes, children can be expensive but within reason, we are still able to bank as much as we can. I give you both kudos!! OBVIOUSLY you know what you are doing and with a child, soon to arrive, I agree with you and think you’ll do just fine! Congrats again!! A few more years and I look foward to my husband and I, along with the kiddies, taking more vacations!!

    Reply
  26. Kody

    What a great story. Very inspiring. I love hearing things like this is possible.

    Reply
  27. Reginald Wilson

    Most people I know don’t make the amount of money that you made at Microsoft. But that not withstanding, you did a good job saving some of it to enjoy now.

    Reply
  28. Fernando LAN (DYN0M1T3)

    What an inspiration! You guys are living the life that I want to live with my girlfriend! I’m going to be 45 years old, and I really don’t want to wait until I’m 60 years old to have fun at any beach. I rather live like you guys are living, and still be young enough to enjoy life the way it was meant to be. I need help if you can find the time. Please! Teach me. Where do I start? What do I do first?

    Reply
  29. Matt

    What is ur investment strategy I see ur trying to svg 4% annual return any advice?
    Thx

    Reply
  30. Dayton

    A great inspiring life. I hope more people will follow your examples.

    Reply
  31. Dana

    Is there any way I can get sort of a list of strategies you use or do? I would be interested in seeing what they are. Please let me know thanks. And congrats on your new baby!!!

    Reply
  32. Patience Umutoni

    Thanks for the pretty lessons about living a precious life. You have inspired me alot. Am 33 and i plan to retire at 55. otherwise i would like to welcome you to RWANDA/Kigali a country of beauty; landscapes, the scarce primates(gorillas), wonderful cultures with hospitality to name but afew.

    Reply
  33. ACE3304

    It says that you saved around $1MM when you retired. Based on what you said you would spend annually ($40k), wouldnt the money run out before your wife turns 50?(Probably a little longer as your investments grow) My husband and I want to do the same thing after our babies go off to college so I am just wondering how you are going to do it! :) You guys make me want to save save save!

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      Hi Ace

      Curious, how do you determine that the money will run out in ~15 years?

      Reply
  34. ACE3304

    Gah! Sorry i meant 60, but probably a little longer

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      No worries, 25 years then. But how do you determine that the money will run out? I’ll explain but curious what the starting idea is based on

      Reply
  35. ACE3304

    I have just always been told that nest egg needs to be millions to sustain us through, especially as we age and medical bills could accumulate, and passing and financial help onto my children. But i want ot move to Key West now! :)

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      OK, I got it. That assumption doesn’t hold up to the historical data

      Check out this post: https://gocurrycracker.com/path-100-equities/

      In it I use a tool called cFIREsim (http://www.cfiresim.com) to analyze retirement periods of up to 60 years assuming a 4% withdrawal rate (so $40k/year on a $1 million portfolio, with increasing withdrawals to adjust for inflation)

      In the worst economic times in history (great depression, nasty inflation of the 70’s, etc…) at the end of 60 years the portfolio would still be worth millions of dollars

      Live 60 years, living large the whole time, and when you die you still have ridiculous amounts of money

      Reply
      • AE3304

        okay, i”m insprired! Thank you for sharing – I am sending this article to my husband, NOW

        Reply
  36. ACE3304

    Aren’t you worried money could get tight if there were another market crash or your investment wasn’t growing as fast? I think that would make me panic :)

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      There is nothing I would love more right now than a market panic of the size of 2008 all over again
      https://gocurrycracker.com/reminiscing-about-the-glory-days-of-2008/

      Shoes go on sale at 50% off, and people crush each other to get in the door. Stocks go on sale at 50% off, and people want nothing but to get rid of them. Strange creatures, we humans

      Reply
      • Kevin

        I know this isn’t an investing blog but I’m also keeping my fingers crossed for an upcoming fire sale on equities! QE has created some “interesting” valuations with all that liquidity having no where else to go in search of returns.

        Also, love your blog! My wife and I are almost the same age and currently living quite similarly. Perhaps you are my brother from another mother.

        Reply
        • Go Curry Cracker

          Hi Kevin. A fire sale would be great, I’ve been wanting to close our our bond position for awhile

          Congrats on living your life on your own terms, brother :)

          Reply
  37. Milton Mclaughlin

    Go Curry Cracker : quick question. What investments did you use to grow that nest funds. what funds, stocks etc.

    Reply
  38. loni O

    Great story! I am soooo inspired. My concern is my husband and I both have good jobs, we invest in our 401K only. I don’t know where to start investing. I’m a little afraid to make a leap, of fears of losing it all. Where did you start the process?

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      Hi Loni. 2 good jobs and investing in your 401k is a great start

      Have you read the book, Your Money or Your Life? Any library will have it, and it is a great read

      One way to think about the tradeoff between spending vs savings is here:
      https://gocurrycracker.com/10-years-and-a-day/

      As for investing, Jim Collins’ stock series is one of the best things the Internet has to offer: http://jlcollinsnh.com/stock-series/

      Reply
  39. Jason

    I love this so much. When I tell people I want to be retired by 35 most people just laugh and I usually sulk away uttering under my breath: “I was being serious.” Most people don’t understand. When a co-worker talks about a $100 pair of shoes or god help us, a $300 purse I feel sick. The things people spend money on. Sorry guys but now I have to segway to my own personal story. After watching the movie “Blood Brother” (must see) i realized that I don’t need stuff, I need interpersonal relationships, adventures and experiences. Stuff will come and go, break down and be forgotten. When you’re 70 will you look back and say: “Gosh, I used to have this awesome 50″ TV.” I hope not. My wife and I decided a year ago to to trade our 3 bedroom 2 bath house for a small apartment where we pay less than half the rent we initially did. We sold most of our stuff and have pulled all our money and devoted it to paying off debt (1 more year left to go) until we are paying ourselves instead of paying someone else. We still have things like computers and iphones but we no longer clutter our lives with meaningless “stuff” and we’ve learned a lot. Like, don’t want to pay for cable or pay Netflix? Watch movies and TV shows at ProjectFreeTv or Letmewatchthis.com. When you go to a new place or city ditch the car and ride your bike you will be surprised about how much more you will see and learn. Use sites like AirBnb or couchsufing.com for cheap places to stay and sign up for Groupon and Living Social to get great deals on a variety of activities around you. Last August I took a Trapeze class with a groupon. No joke. I feel I may have gotten off topic here. Oh well

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      Congrats on discovering that more spending and more stuff doesn’t mean more happiness

      It doesn’t cost a lot to live a wonderful and happy life

      Reply
  40. Richard Chen

    Just a quick question, how did you calculate $39,485, the annual run rate? I recently just moved to Da’an, Taipei with my family from US.

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      Welcome to Taipei

      The annual run rate is 365 days/year x Cumulative $/day (avg daily spend since we retired to 12/31/2014)
      Or roughly $108/day * 365 = $39,485

      Reply
  41. pankyvn

    Your decision are undoubtedly right. I was a poor teacher in Asia but I still planned for my retirement. At last I quitted my job in my 40ties. I didn’t have much money to travel abroad every year (I would like to stay in one country long ennough to learn its culture and socialize with people). If this year, I travel to other continent, then in next year, I go around Asian countries.

    In my opinion, when you getting old, you couldn’t enjoy many things at the right time. It makes sense for our human being. Oneday, if you go to Viet Nam please let me know, I have place for your family, though it’s basic for American stylelife but it’s free :-))

    Reply
  42. Lester

    Share more of your secrets/fav spots in San Miguel. I’ve fallen for it, bought a house , and plan to make it my place of retirement in a few years. Thanks and congrats!

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      Go to El Petit Four. Best cheesecake we’ve ever had anywhere

      Reply
  43. JB

    You spent 98K in 2014? This is a big increase from 2013 am I correct?

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      98k is the total amount spent since we retired (2 years total as of 12/31/2014)

      We spent much more in 2014 than 2013, with the biggest increase coming from the IVF procedure

      Reply
  44. K. Nunez

    Hi, I’m new to the blog and really enjoying it! How do you figure the net worth you need to sustain at 4% withdrawal? I am trying to figure out how much my husband and I will have to save! Thanks!

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      It is 25x total annual spending

      Take your target budget, multiply by 25, and that is the minimum investments you will need

      Reply
  45. Doug

    May I ask how many years your combined income was at the 135k and if you have any extensive investments. Thank you, good luck on parenthood its the greatest thing in the world

    Reply
  46. Felicity

    I think its great you can be retired but what about the expenses you don’t count on. Also what will you do when you retire if you have to rent and don’t own your own home? I think its ok when you are a couple but when you have kids it changes. I try to budget and it takes a lot of will power, but it can get boring watching your pennies as well. I don’t have children as I don’t want the expense and responsibility involved.

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      Hi Felicity

      We all have our own path to follow. I never wanted children either, but adore the one we have and would like to add another.

      As for unexpected expenses, that is what an emergency fund is for. It just involves saving a little extra

      For most people, buying a house is a poor financial choice. We plan to be renters for life.

      All the best

      Jeremy

      Reply
  47. Salman Kardushi

    Is food that exorbitantly expensive in Taiwan? You guys end up spending ~$500-700 per person per month, but it usually costs me about $100 to $200 in Seattle. I might reconsider Taiwan in that case.

    Reply
  48. san

    looking forward to 2015 expense summary, when could we expect it?

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      Soon. I think.

      Reply
  49. Vinc

    What about 2015? Curious how kids and renting two places (Taipei apartment and Airbnb during travel) increase the budget

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      I’ll get this up someday in the near future.

      But we didn’t rent a Taipei apartment and Airbnb. We had only one at a time.

      Reply
      • Vinc

        How do you do that? Do you sublease the apartment every time you take a trips?

        Reply
        • Go Curry Cracker

          The lease was up and we moved out. We are homeless.

          Reply
  50. Cathleen

    I’m just starting to save and in my late 40s. It’s a long story, but big student loan, very few jobs. I’m just wondering if any of your go curry friends are Canadian? I don’t mind working another 5 yrs as I will have a pension from a university, but I’m wondering where to look for investment advice from a Canadian perspective.

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      I’m a fan of Garth Turner’s Greater Fool. There are links in the side bar to investment options/recommendations.

      Beyond that I’m not sure, sorry.

      Reply
      • Storugglan

        I would also recommend Canadian Couch Potato:

        http://canadiancouchpotato.com/

        There investement approach seems to be in line with yours.

        Reply
  51. Nikki T

    Love the blog! Just curious which app or software you use to track expenses. Personal Capital does great for wealth tracking, but lacks in cash transactions and details. Do you use anything in addition to Personal Capital?

    Reply
    • Go Curry Cracker

      Mostly I use PC, with an Excel spreadsheet as a second opinion.

      If there were one feature of PC that I would add/improve, it is better cash management. That said, cash should be a very small percentage of total spending for any US household. Use a rewards credit card instead and get free travel for the spending you are doing anyway.

      Reply
  52. thomas schmidt

    Do you have any updated info on this? I’ve found a few FIRE blogs, but almost none have more than 1-2 years.
    I’d love to see if 2015,2016, and 2017 worked as well for you.

    Thanks!

    Reply
      • thomas schmidt

        Thanks for that. A little disheartening to see spending increase by over 100% though…
        I get it, having a kid was a game changer, but still the 1m plan doesn’t seem very practical anymore without a serious side hustle (aka job)
        I think I’ll work another few years.

        Reply
        • Go Curry Cracker

          Disheartening is the wrong word. We can spend more than we are presently and be under 4%, even without any income from a source that could be construed as a job.

          We never had a “1m” plan. We had a “have kids and support our desired standard of living in Seattle plan.” Even so, our increase in spending isn’t really kid related. It is because we have been living large in Europe vs living large in Central America. All part of the plan…

          Anyhoo, working longer is not a terrible idea. I worked 3 years longer than was necessary, for example.

          Best of luck to ya.

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